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 New book on Klaus Schulze, by Olaf Lux

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Jon
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 01, 2021 10:10 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

« BruecknerAmbient » wrote:
« Jon » wrote:
Thanks. Looking fine. Will cost me 56 euro though...


I agree that it's quite a steep price that probably only a true fan will be willing to pay.

It's the fate of such independent projects though that production costs for small runs of books are high, and the explosion of shipping costs in recent years isn't Olaf's fault, either...

(Some readers remarked on FB that Edgar Froese's autobiography was even more expensive, but less coherent btw. Then of course, it was still by the man himself...)


.


Had KS wriiten this book himself, I would not have hesitated buying it. There is always something special about autobiographies.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 01, 2021 10:14 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

To electrobs:

10 Euros to Sweden? Where did you get that price?

The double album is a download, right?

You mean Mark Jenkins' recent KS book was shitty?

I have the Greg Allen KS book, but I guess that one can't really compare with this one by Lux.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 01, 2021 11:32 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

« Jon » wrote:
To electrobs:

10 Euros to Sweden? Where did you get that price?

The double album is a download, right?

You mean Mark Jenkins' recent KS book was shitty?

I have the Greg Allen KS book, but I guess that one can't really compare with this one by Lux.
_________________


1. Yes, the shipping cost came up automatically.

2. Yes, it’sa download

3. Yes, i meant that “great” book

4. I don’t have that book, but i heard that it’s not very good either (and the price is quite high for that too)

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 02, 2021 5:40 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

« Jon » wrote:
Had KS wriiten this book himself, I would not have hesitated buying it. There is always something special about autobiographies.


Obviously! Smile

« electrobs » wrote:
« Jon » wrote:
You mean Mark Jenkins' recent KS book was shitty?


3. Yes, i meant that “great” book


I haven't read Mark's book yet, but apparently, quite a few people dislike it, and I wonder why...
From what I've gathered, he's writing more from a musician's perspective, focusing on gear, composition and performance - is that correct?

If so, I wonder what's wrong with that - to me, it's something I'd perhaps appreciated to see a bit more in the other books.

Or is it interesting to musicians only, and less to the "regular" fan (of course many musicians are fans at the same time)...?


« electrobs » wrote:
« Jon » wrote:
I have the Greg Allen KS book, but I guess that one can't really compare with this one by Lux.


4. I don’t have that book, but i heard that it’s not very good either (and the price is quite high for that too)


Indeed it's hard to compare both books, as the main content of Greg's book are detailed reviews of (nearly) all of KS' albums from a very personal, yet enthusiastic, perspective.

I enjoyed reading it a lot - even though I don't agree to all of Greg's opinions on all albums (then again I didn't expect to...), I found his thoughts interesting and stimulating: often I wanted to immediately listen to a particular album after reading about it and to compare my impression with his...

Most of the (exclusive) interviews in Greg's book are good reads, too - especially the ones with Harald Großkopf and with Robert Rich.


« Jon » wrote:
´The double album is a download, right?


It's indeed a download (so far), but who said it's a double album? Razz Certainly neither Olaf nor me... Wink

In fact it's material to fill one regular CD (77 minutes) plus one "bonus track" of 11:26 minutes (see below) - 1 hour and 28 minutes in total.
For comparison: the original double vinyl of "Audentity" has a playing time of 1 hour and 39 minutes...

The last track, "Klaustrophilia Part 7" was intended by my as a "hidden" bonus track which listeners only get with the download, but that wouldn't show on BC (because it's actually a variation on "Part 2").
I told Olaf so, but at some point that information got lost, and when I saw at the albums release that it was added as a regular track, I just left it at that (because at that point quite a few people had already bought and downloaded it...).

While I'm just talking about "Klaustrophilia", I hope You don't mind if I take the occasion to tell how it came about at all:

Olaf and I a personal friends since many years now, even long before he started the book project. When he had the idea to do it - and from there until he finished it years later - we talked about it on many occasions. I had the honour to be the first person to read his first complete version (which he has quite thoroughly honed and polished before the actual release).

In the first place, however, Olaf asked for my advice as a graphical designer, and during the actual production phase, matters of layout, typesetting and format were at the center of our conversation. He also entrusted me with the design of the covers - based on photographies he got (and got permission to use) by Guido Harari himself. In fact I did, I think, six or seven different designs, from which Olaf picked his favourite.

The idea of adding any music came up only late, when talking about what kind of platform might be useful for distribution (like me, Olaf has a dislike for Amazon). It was me who considered Bandcamp first, but we soon dropped the idea again - because it's a music platform in the first place, and before you can offer "merch" there, you need to upload some music.

After a while (probably checking other platforms in the meantime) Olaf came back to my idea and asked me more about Bandcamp.
At that point, I suggested that he could do a compilation of music by members of his "Deutsches Klaus Schulze Forum" and put that on Bandcamp, maybe make it a regular project. As some of You might know, half of the EM scene is a member there...

Olaf considered that (I believe), but ultimately came to the conclusion that the extra effort to run some kind of "label" involving a number of artists was too complicated and time consuming.

In the end, he asked me (quite close to his planned release date) if I could provide "some music" to go along with his book.
I said "That's a bit on short notice now, but I guess I might find something in my archives..."

The bulk of the music on "Klaustrophilia" was taken from a rehearsal improvisation in my little studio, recorded in 2019 during my preparation for the concert with Detlev Everling that resulted in our album "Reiseziel Mond". Actually, I had even originally planned to use bits from that rehearsal as bonus tracks on that album (there was enough of other extra material though, so I didn't depend on it).

Only the opening track was a new composition, specifically for "Klaustrophilia". The only other studio track, "Part 3" was based on material I had recorded in 2018 for a collaboration with another artist that, in the end, didn't happen.

All in all I think it's a nice album (minus one or two flaws in the improvised sections - but hey! - isn't that just like KS...?!? ) but in the end I wished I could have come up with a stronger tribute to my favourite musician. With hindsight, to me only the first ten minutes of "Part 2" are special.

But it was just what I could offer at that point of time. It was a question of going with the material at hand, or not doing it at all.
Doing a favour to Olaf (and I owe him many a favour) and having the chance to introduce myself to some new listeners - or not...

Obviously, we did it - and from many reactions I received, quite a few people enjoyed the music (which I'm happy about).
And after all, it's just a free gimmick to those who bought the book anyway.

Coming back to the original question - is it a download?

Yes - but if enough people would ask me, I might consider to offer a CD-r version one day...

.

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Jon
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2021 1:04 am    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

I'm not really interested in any "tribute" music to KS, I just want to read the book. :lol:

I enjoyed Jenkins' TD book, even if the errors were quite many.

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Last edited by Jon on Sun Jan 03, 2021 12:09 am; edited 1 time in total

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2021 1:06 am    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

Electrobs, do you have a link to where you got that shipping price?
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2021 7:51 am    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

« Jon » wrote:
Electrobs, do you have a link to where you got that shipping price?

I have a BC page/account and just ordered the book. The shipping price came automatically. I’ve checked it again yesterday, and It’s actually 9 Euros. Maybe It’s cheaper for EU countries.

Regarding Jenkins’ Ultimate Critical something s - Yes, That’s my problem exactly. The many errors, the low quality photos, the structure of the book and the price.

OK, i can accept the errors in the TD book (actually not). He just followed the “no TD stuff without typos / errors” path😀😀😀 but there are quite many errors in the KS book too.
Of course - i didn’t bought the KW book ...
It’s clear that He just made them for money. They are not a lobour of love, It’s just f***ing business ...😡😡😡

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2021 11:44 am    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

« Jon » wrote:
Electrobs, do you have a link to where you got that shipping price?


I know You didn't ask me so excuse me for interfering, but You can find the shipping costs here:

https://www.dhl.de/de/privatkunden/pakete-versenden/online-frankieren.html

It's 8.89 € from Germany to both Sweden and Norway, as far as I can see...


« Jon » wrote:
I'm not really interested in any "tribute" music to KS, I just want to read the book. Laughing


Fair enough (others though might be interested).

By the way, isn't any Berlin School a tribute to TD and/or KS...?

Just like any synth pop is a tribute to Kraftwerk, any melodic EM is a tribute to Jarre and/or Vangelis and any ambient is a tribute to Eno, and every orchestral sound track is a tribute to John Wiliams (who's music is a tribute to all those late romantic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century), and every Led Zeppelin song is a tribute to Howlin' Wolf (except of course the one that's a tribute to Roy Harper).
And so on... Wink

No matter if the artists are aware of it or not, by the way - there's no escape from that.

Especially in recent times - nothing new under the sun since 1995.

Anyway...

.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2021 9:44 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

Olaf Lux' book just received a positive review by Siggi Zielinski at "Babyblaue Seiten", an important German prog rock review page!

Read the original (German) review here, or my (rough) English translation below:
http://www.babyblaue-seiten.de/index.php?content=buch&buch=227&top=lesestoff#259

* * *

"The name Olaf Lux was already known to me in his capacity as administrator of the "German Klaus Schulze Forum" on Facebook. At some point, Olaf Lux made the only right decision to write and publish a book about the object of his musical passion, namely a book about Klaus Schulze. Anyone who, like Olaf Lux, has a good writing style and encyclopaedic knowledge about Klaus Schulze should definitely realise such a project. From the fans' point of view - and probably also from a music-historical point of view - a comprehensive book on the life and work of the German electronic legend had become necessary because the previous publications about Klaus Schulze either date back a long time or were somewhat one-sided in their "a fan writes for the fans" manner.

The book title "Violins don't grow on trees" comes from a saying by Klaus Schulze, who is known among his friends and acquaintances as a humorous and down-to-earth contemporary. Which is a phenomenon in itself, considering that his music suggests a rather detached person. "Violins don't grow on trees" is what Klaus Schulze likes to say as soon as you want to discuss with him the question of whether synthesizers can be counted among the "real" instruments. In contrast to violins, as such questioners probably wanted to suggest.

The book turns out to be a real treasure trove for fans and music researchers. There will probably be hardly a fan who would not learn some unknown details from the book. On 490 pages, all topics concerning the musician Klaus Schulze are dealt with in detail. All the stages of his long career, the concert tours, the making of his regular albums, the side projects, the collaboration with the numerous musicians, the instruments, the soundtrack projects, his way of working and recording, the CD box sets and his picturesque residence with the integrated recording studio, all this takes place in the book, of course. You can tell, the author has done his homework brilliantly.

The other topics are also covered, including several attempts by Schulze to found his own label, or to run one for a longer period of time, as well as the stories about the album covers. Several versions of an album cover, if available, are of course also discussed. With almost scientific precision, the author investigates the question of which of the approximately 500 tracks known to date by the musician appeared under which title, with which running time, on which album, promo CD, or in which CD box. Of course, not all titles are treated in equal detail in this way, the 490 pages are not enough for that, but only if it seems informative. The numerous new editions included, of course. Some small mishaps, title mix-ups, what can happen with the new editions, Lux of course also mentions.

With so much material on the art, on the music itself, the person of the artist has to take a back seat if the book is not to have 1000 pages. Even so, "Violins Don't Grow on Trees" contains a comparatively large amount of information about Klaus Schulze as a person. It probably wouldn't have to be more, even if one would expect hundreds more pages of readable material about this musician's statements on music and all conceivable topics.

As if Lux's work were not praiseworthy enough so far, there are also some detailed reviews of the films in which Klaus Schulze's music was used under "The Appendices". This includes the storyline, sometimes with a description of the individual film scenes and the music fragments used for them. This is followed in the book by the short memories of some colleagues, of course concerning Klaus Schulze. Because "Violins Don't Grow on Trees" is an all-encompassing work on the chosen topic, the last chapter contains the encyclopaedic section with discography, filmography, list of sources, glossary, group index and the like.

The buyer of the book gets a free download of the album "Klaustrophilia" by the musician Michael Brückner, who is a friend of the author. For "Klaustrophilia", Brückner was inspired by Klaus Schulze's music.

With "Violins Don't Grow on Trees" (subtitle: "Life and Work of Klaus Schulze"), Olaf Lux has succeeded in writing a very informative and detailed book on the subject of Klaus Schulze, which should be indispensable for fans. The professional approach makes the book a valuable source of information if a music historian ever wants to write a doctoral thesis on Schulze."

The book is self-published and is only available directly from Olaf Lux: https://olaflux.bandcamp.com/. An English edition is also available there.

* * *

.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:21 am    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

Ah what the heck, sold! Wink
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:20 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

« softroom » wrote:
Ah what the heck, sold! Wink


You mean You already re-sold Your copy, Paul...? Laughing


By the way, the Babyblauen Seiten also have been kind to me today:

Reviewer (and BBS founder) Siggy Zielinski wrote some witty and positive (if slightly wry) words about "Klaustrophilia" at that German prog rock review page...

Read Siggy's original review (in German) here, or my (rough) English translation below (not sure though if the subtle sly humor comes across there - maybe Paul should have translated it...)

http://www.babyblaue-seiten.de/album_19351.html#oben

* * *
Would you like a whole music album to go with your book? That's no problem between good friends.
Olaf Lux, the author of the book "Violins Don't Grow on Trees - The Life and Work of Klaus Schulze" asked his friend and musician Michael Brückner if he would like to contribute a track (or possibly two) to the book about the influential "electronic musician" Klaus Schulze. As is mysteriously possible among the particularly gifted electronic artists, Brückner immediately delivered about 90 minutes of music. Whether parts of it had already been in Brückner's archive for some time, or whether it all came about more or less spontaneously, is unknown to me.
All of it, as specified, was inspired by the sound worlds of Klaus Schulze, even if it comes across as anything but mere copying. Rather, it seems to me that here a musician is bowing to another musician, at eye level, without giving up his own identity. By the way, "Klaustrophilia", the title of the tribute album, can also be purchased as a download independently of the book.

As an "electronic" fan, or sympathiser of the "Berlin School" of electronic music, I ask myself with most of Brückner's albums, "how does he do it so that this old concept, conceived around the mid-70s, still doesn't seem boring?"
The ingredients, such as the spherical synth pads, the sequencer patterns, the subtle rhythms, the mysterious virtual choirs in the vastness of the sonic realms, and the synthesiser solos have basically remained the same for decades. I guess it comes down to a talent for remixing and rehashing the familiar ingredients.
In Brückner's case, the beautifully romantic elements are supplemented again and again by various slightly contrasting accents, probably disturbing for the pure romantics, which expand the framework of the "Berlin School". On "Klaustrophilia", for me it is above all the (possibly spontaneously improvised) solos on the keyboard instruments used by Brückner, which I am not familiar with, that go beyond the cosy and the predictable. The solos, not Brückner's keyboard instruments. In terms of sound, they could also be Moog synthesizers.
If times weren't so bad for musicians, Brückner could perhaps turn into a worthy successor to Schulze and thus become quite wealthy, as was probably possible in the 70s. For the income from Spotify & Co. though, a musician can perhaps afford a pizza once a year.

In all this, I almost forgot that "Klaustrophilia" is really only dedicated to Klaus Schulze, because Brückner's ideas always remain present. In doing so, he not only takes up with the great role model Schulze, but also sometimes uses sounds that I think I have already heard with Tangerine Dream, or sounds that I have heard neither with Tangerine Dream nor with Klaus Schulze. After "Klaustrophilia" I think Brückner must like the steel drums because such sounds are heard quite frequently here. Whatever Brückner uses as a basis, the man remains independent in what he elicits from his keys.
"Klaustrophilia" is convincing both as a very good electronic album and as a homage to the great Klaus S.: I discover many more traces of Klaus S. here and rarely any of Edgar F. and his mates.

On the other hand, one must not forget that without the pioneers in their field, like this Klaus Schulze for example, that even the music of Michael Brückner would be hard to imagine. Who knows, maybe Brückner's natural talent would have been inspired by something completely different if Klaus Schulze had never existed. What an eerie thought, by the way, the world is hard to imagine without Klaus Schulze.

11 (of 15) points

Siggy Zielinski for Babyblaue Seiten

* * *

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